Mar 262014
 

1426163_10152538970789156_1955504315_aOn Wednesdays we remember that a brother languishes in a foreign prison.

We do more than just remember, however…we stand with him by using our social media to advocate for his release.

We ask that you change your Facebook profile picture to his and that you “like”  the “Free Saeed” Facebook page and participate in some of the activities that promote his cause.

  4 Responses to “Free Saeed”

  1. I am committed to the effort to bring attention to Saeed Abedini. I will continue to advocate his release. However, I am brought up short to explain the lack of passion to free Amir Hekmati a former US Marine who was given a death sentence for espionage. That has been overturned but he languishes in an Iranian prison. Where is the passion from veterans on the level of the passion from believers to #FreeSaeed? Why is the US government not aggressively openly advocating this man’s innocence and freedom? Why is there no traction for him? Is it his ethnicity? Is it his religion? Is it his perceived guilt? Why does our nation make such an emphasis on leaving no soldier behind and yet this man has seemingly been forgotten? What is the deal?

    https://www.facebook.com/FreeAmirHekmati

  2. Dread,
    I have looked into the background of this guy and all the companies he worked with (excluding the Marines) screams spook to me.
    I could see him being recruited along the way because a lot of these companies work hand in hand with the intelligence community.

    Saeed’s case is cut and dried.
    This guys, to me, not so much.

    I would love to have him home, but when a government imprisons a spy that is well within any states right as I see it.
    If we have some Iranian intelligence asset we are holding in prison I would suggest a prisoner exchange, that is usually what happens in these situations.

    That is why I can’t get worked up about him.

  3. Thanks Derek,

    I have been troubled by this and needed other eyes on it

  4. We tortured men and water boarded them under states rights. Some of them had families that desired them home…a lot of them are still locked up to this day.

    War justifies inhumanity in the eyes of some.

    WWJD?

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